NAUI Recreational Air No - Deco Dive Tables 35511 058175

Mfg Part #: 35511

NAUI Recreational Air No - Deco Dive Tables

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 $15.95 
  • The tables use the modeling of the Reduced Gradient Bubble Model (RGBM)
  • Can be easily used by any diver who can read a watch and a depth gauge
  • An outline of definitions and how to use the table is printed on the back of each table
  • Tables:
    • 3 Air Tables:
      • Sea Level- 2,000 ft/610m
      • 2,000-6,000 ft/610m-1,829m
      • 6,000-10,000 ft./1,829-3,048m
  • FULL MANUFACTURER'S WARRANTY

Customer Reviews for NAUI Recreational Air No - Deco Dive Tables:

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Average Customer Review: based on 1 reviews.

Rating: NAUI RGBM Tables
Reviewer: Nicholas Bird
Like the tables. Well organized, easy to use and helpful for altitude dive planning.

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Naui Recreational Air No Deco Dive Tables

Manufacturer Part Number 35511

The NAUI Dive Tables use a Letter Group designation to express the amount of residual nitrogen in your body. The letters range in sequence from A to L. The letter A represents a small amount of nitrogen and the amount of nitrogen increases as the letters progress towards L. When you dive, a Letter Group from the tables designates the amount of nitrogen you have absorbed during the dive. As you spend time on the surface between dives, you are assigned to “lower” Letter Groups as you offgas nitrogen.

Dive Table Rules

You must understand the following NAUI Dive Table rules completely. Similar rules will apply to any new set of dive tables or dive computer that you might use to calculate your dive times.

Ascend no faster than 9 meters (30 feet) per minute. This is 0.3 meters (1 foot) every two seconds. You need a timing device and a depth gauge (or a dive computer) to measure your rate of ascent. This rate will seem quite slow to you.

Use the exact or the next greater number listed in the table for your depth. If you exceed a number in the table, use the next greater number. The depths in the table range from 12 meters (40 feet) to 40 meters (130 feet) and increase in increments of 3 meters (10 feet). For example, you round a dive to 13 meters (43 feet) up to a 15 meter (50 foot) dive.

Use the exact or the next greater number listed in the table for your time. If you exceed a number in the table, use the next greater number. The times range from 5 minutes to 130 minutes. For example, you round a dive to 15 meters (50 feet) for 41 minutes up to 50 minutes.

Use the deepest depth you reached during your dive to determine the dive schedule for your dive. For example, if you do a dive to 18 meters (60 feet), but spend most of the time at 12 meters (40 feet), you must consider the dive to be an 18 meter (60 foot) dive.

Always make your deepest dive first when making a series of dives. Plan each of your repetitive dives to a shallower depth than your previous dive. This might allow you to offgas nitrogen on progressively shallower dives and prevents you from carrying progressively larger amount of residual nitrogen on deeper repetitive dives.

Consider any dive shallower than 12 meters (40 feet) to be a 12-meter (40-foot) dive when planning your dives.

Surface Interval Time (SIT) must be at least 10 minutes between dives. If your SIT is less than 10 minutes, you must consider your second dive as a continuation of the first dive. NAUI recommends a SIT of at least one hour between dives.

Use the next greater dive time if your dive is particularly cold or strenuous. For example, if you do a dive to 18 meters (60 feet) for 22 minutes, the 22 minutes rounds to 25 minutes. However, if you become chilled during the dive, round the time again to 30 minutes.

Avoid dives that take you right to the no-decompression limit for any given depth and time combination. If you accidentally overstay your bottom time or use an incorrect ascent rate on such a dive, you could be in a required decompression situation or suffer DCS. Always allow yourself enough time to make a slow, comfortable ascent with plenty of air.

 

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