Please contact our Scuba Diving Instructors by live chat or phone 1-800-34-SCUBA. We are standing by to answer any of your Scuba Diving questions.
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#130 - 02/01/01 07:33 AM What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
Doorman Offline
new diver

Registered: 02/01/01
Posts: 2
Loc: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
A question came up in my science class today about the deepest that a human can go underwater. Does anybody know how far it is possible to go or a record of how deep someone went. This includes using special equipment, as long as it is not some kind of submarine. Thank you. The sooner the better!

Top
#131 - 02/01/01 09:20 AM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
WaterBoy2 Offline
avid diver

Registered: 01/16/01
Posts: 13
Loc: Littleton, CO, US of A
I am not 100% positive but i believe that the absolute deepest a diver can go is around 430 feet. I am sorry if i am way off. Happy and safe diving!

Peace,
Ben


Top
#132 - 02/01/01 03:09 PM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
Rebecca Offline
veteran

Registered: 11/06/00
Posts: 561
Recreational diving limit is 130ft. Although a lot of people will start feeling the effects of nitrogen narcosis around 100 feet. To go any deeper would require extensive training and equipment.
quote:
Originally posted by Doorman:
A question came up in my science class today about the deepest that a human can go underwater. Does anybody know how far it is possible to go or a record of how deep someone went. This includes using special equipment, as long as it is not some kind of submarine. Thank you. The sooner the better!


Top
#133 - 02/02/01 10:09 PM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
sherman_02 Offline
just got here

Registered: 02/02/01
Posts: 1
Hi to all- I would just like to start out by saying I have never dived in my life, so you probably wonder what I am doing here. Well, had read an article about the deaths of Chris and Chrissy Rouse on a wreck dive in an article in National Geographic magazine. I later found the book that this article was based on by Bernie Chowdhury called The Last Dive, and have become very interested in this topic though i have absolutely no experience. Anyway, in the book Chowdhury writes that Sheck Exley holds the world deep-scuba-dive record of 867 ft, set in 1989, accomplished by strategic calculations in gas mixtures at different decompression levels along with extreme skill, though it doesn't seem like many divers venture at all close to this depth because of the danger.

Top
#134 - 02/07/01 01:37 PM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
OneThreeSeven Offline
avid diver

Registered: 02/07/01
Posts: 7
quote:
Originally posted by Doorman:
A question came up in my science class today about the deepest that a human can go underwater. Does anybody know how far it is possible to go or a record of how deep someone went. This includes using special equipment, as long as it is not some kind of submarine. Thank you. The sooner the better!

The real answer is "All the way to the bottom." There is no physical limit. The real constraints are the mix you breath, and how much of it you have. Navy Experimental Dive Unit divers have been to 1000 feet using saturation techniques (diving out of a bell, etc).


Top
#135 - 02/20/01 04:09 PM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
Mac8 Offline
veteran

Registered: 02/20/01
Posts: 46
OneThreeSeven are you retarded?! "All the way to the bottom" are you clinically brain dead? There limits to everything, especially diving. I tell you what brainic, I'll pay for a trip and all the scuab gear you need, and we'll take a little trip out to the Mariana Trench and you can dive it. And I tell you what, if you survive the experience, you can keep all the gear I buy. You freaking moron.

Top
#136 - 02/20/01 04:56 PM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
Dave Offline
avid diver

Registered: 02/20/01
Posts: 12
Loc: Davis, CA, USA
What's with all this name calling? If you can't be mature and respect other peoples' views, maybe you shouldn't take part in these discussions.

Top
#137 - 02/24/01 12:29 AM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
OneThreeSeven Offline
avid diver

Registered: 02/07/01
Posts: 7
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Mac8:
OneThreeSeven are you retarded?!

No, I just happen to know the guy thats been to 1000 feet on a rebreather. Come on up here and I'll introduce you.

So what's your excuse? Just get into that DM course?


"All the way to the bottom" are you clinically brain dead? There limits to everything, especially diving.

Right. Cause you're the expert. Like I said, come on up, and I'll introduce you. Then you can go back to selling snorkles to OW students for minimum wage.

You freaking moron.

My, what a punk.



Top
#138 - 02/26/01 10:00 AM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
Reef Guy Offline
veteran

Registered: 11/29/00
Posts: 21
Loc: Puerto Rico
Well like Rebecca said, the limits for recreational diving is 130 ft. But note the key word here is "Recreational" Any type of diving beyond recreational is much more complex and involves different techniques,and not to mention skill.

If you want a recent example, take the divers that went down to investigate that russian Submarine that sunk, if am not mistaken those divers went down over 500 meters, but with the help of a submarine.

Strait to the decompretion chamber they went!


Top
#139 - 02/27/01 11:46 AM Re: What is the deepest that a diver is physically able to go?
Colin Offline
just got here

Registered: 02/27/01
Posts: 1
Doorman,

As your question relates to scuba diving, the deepest that a human has been while diving scuba is roughly 925 feet. The "world record" is considered to be a tie between Jim Bowden (Zacaton, 925f) and Nuno Gomez (Boesmansgat, 282m). Sheck Exley was diving with Jim Bowden on that same dive at Zacaton, but did not survive.

Commercial and military diving endeavors have placed humans considerably deeper than 925 feet, but these dives have been through the use of considerable surface support, and the divers were not using traditional scuba.

Good luck with school.



Top
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >


Moderator:  BobG, Mel, Reggie